Lace Trim Handkerchief

Easy and Fast to make - Lace Trim Handkerchief

Easy and Fast to make - Lace Trim Handkerchief

Picture 1 of 4 (Click arrow for more pictures)

As a Generation Y, we hold a duty to educate our next generation (Z) so that they don’t repeat our mistake in slowly killing the Earth. To be frank, I am not a 100% green folk as many does, whom who put all their time & efforts to save the Earth, I am just doing my best in my own comfort zone, sigh… (shame on me ** blush*** !!!!) Besides using old bed sheets to make into rags & rugs; scrap paper tube into pencil holder; old torn T-shirt into tarn; grocery plastic bags into recycle bag; one of my tiny efforts is to teach my daughter to be eco-friendly to our mother Earth, for this instant, I encourage her to use handkerchief instead of tissue paper.

I love making handkerchiefs, it is the easiest and fastest project to complete.  All the while, I just zig-zag sewed all the 4 edges of a 10″ x 10″ cotton scrap fabric, those are nothing special to shout about so I never mentioned about them here. This time, I made them a little different so that I have something worth your time to visit my blog (what a good excuse  :roll: LOL….)

This is a very simple and fast to complete project, but…. you need to have some basics:
If you major in crochet: You need to know how to do blanket stitch and use sewing machine for zig-zag stitch. If you can’t sew with sewing machine, it is not end of the world, you can skip it by using a ready-made handkerchief.
If you major in sewing: You need to know how to crochet chain, single crochet stitch and slip stitch. Well, if you really can’t crochet, skip this tutorial, buy some ready-made lace and sew it around the edges of the handkerchief.

Since these hankies are for my daughter, I made them a little feminine with pastel color and matching color lace thread. I can imagine how they would turn out if they were done in contrasting colors.

lace trim handkerchief

{CLICK HERE to get the Lace Trim Handkerchief Pattern.}

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39 comments... read them below or add one

  1. I have often wondered what I could use my old sheets for, but never did come up with an idea. Thanks for this one!

  2. Perfect idea, perfect tutorial! Thank you for sharing it with us ^_^

  3. I love it, so cute and environmental friendly!

  4. i like the idea of doing a blanket stitch around the edge first…i’ve always pushed the crochet hook through the fabric…more time consuming and somewhat painful

  5. These are so sweet and a great tutorial. We’re featuring fabric crafts over at the M&T Spotlight this week and I would love for you to submit this! http://www.makeandtakes.com/spotlight

  6. oh.my.goodness. this is beautiful. thanks for the tutorial.

  7. I recycled a bunch of old flannel receiving blankets into handkerchiefs; they are perfect when you have a cold and want something really soft.

  8. Beautiful post!! I am so going to try this one!

    Here’s a question, though … Are there ultimately any special washing instructions (if the fabric is already pre-washed when you start)? Seeing as these are hankies, I might want to wash them on – ahem – hot!

    • Yes, I pre-washed the fabric before starting the project. If you prefer hot water washing after completing the hanky, just have to make sure the lace can take the temperature too.

  9. This is so beautiful… I also like the fabric and thread color, really nice.

  10. Thanks so much for this fab tutorial. I think handmade hankerchiefs would be perfect for my grand-daughter and my mother so I’m definately gonna try these – love the repurpose of sheets tip – thanks again. Hugs

  11. Thanks for these lovely handkerchiefs. My Grandmother and then my Mom used to make them for me. I have stacks of them, all with white cloth and lovely coloured edgings some of which are quite elaborate. Seeing yours took me down memory lane. Now it’s time for me to be making pretty handkerchiefs and passing them on. I love the fabric and thread you used. They are so cheerful!

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  13. Instead of using this technique for handkerchieves; I buy bundles of faceclothes and use this technique for edging them. It keeps the seams from parting and makes them very pretty when hung up.

  14. I just love your hankies and the crochet lace on them , but I don’t know how or what to use to punch the holes into the hankie, just what kind of a pointer do you use to make the holes. Thanks so much Amanda…………

  15. I know I’m a little late on this but I had to say that before I found this post, I had no idea how to actually crochet on a hanky without holes in it and now I see. Secondly, a good use for old sheets is to make a nice skirt, if the sheets aren’t too warn out. Some ladies at church have no idea that I’m wearing old sheets. Secondly, they make comfy pajamas for the kids. One full-sized sheet can yield one complete set of pajamas for a child. Cheers!

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  17. Thank you that is perfect. I’m going to start my own hankies now.

  18. OMG I have been looking for womens handkerchiefs for so long. I just love your pattern and will certainly try making some. They will make great little gifts. :)

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  20. You could also purchase vintage hankies at any given number of antique stores or popular online auctions and add a crochet border. You would be especially green since you wouldn’t have to purchase new material, instead using what is already available. I have been using them(vintage hankies) for years and love them, love the unique prints, patterns and even shapes(got my mom a circular one once!).

  21. Do you have any patterns for southern belle edging for hankerchiefs?

    • I do not have southern belle edging pattern, but if you have any picture or sample of it, please send me via the contact form, I will develop it if I can see the stitches clearly.

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  23. Have used this same method around the tops of little baby girl socks for my daughter when she was a baby, using plain, thin, white socks and crotcheting a lovely ruffled trim around the top, and folding it down. I still have them stored away 20 years later, and will never part with them!

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  25. plz tell me about the picture with yellow arrow this is the picture after the single stitch or before???

  26. Thank you so much for these instructions!! I’ve been searching on the internet and yours is the ONLY one that shows clear instructions AND pictures. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

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